Simply Trees

Live Oak Tree

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$168.00

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Once a weekFull sunDeer resistant
  • Majestic Evergreen: The Live Oak is a grand evergreen tree with an iconic presence, retaining its lush green foliage year-round and offering shade and shelter to various species.
  • Sprawling Branches: Its wide-spreading branches create a sprawling canopy that provides ample shade and makes it a focal point in the landscape.
  • Longevity and Adaptability: Live Oaks are known for their resilience and can thrive in a range of soil types and environmental conditions, making them a symbol of strength and endurance.

More Details

The Live Oak Tree, scientifically known as Quercus virginiana, stands as a towering emblem of strength and beauty in the southern United States. Renowned for its broad, spreading canopy and sturdy, resilient nature, this evergreen oak provides year-round shade and aesthetic appeal. Its sprawling branches, draped with Spanish moss, create an iconic silhouette that is synonymous with the southern landscape. Ideal for large spaces, the Live Oak is celebrated for its longevity and its ability to withstand extreme weather conditions, making it a beloved and majestic addition to parks, large gardens, and historic sites.

Growth rate: Slow to moderate growth rate; can reach 40-80 feet in height with a spread of 60-100 feet or more.

Please note: Images on our website depict plants and trees at full maturity to showcase their expected grown characteristics. These images are illustrative examples only and do not represent the size of plants or trees upon delivery.

Pruning: Prune as needed to maintain a healthy structure, remove dead or damaged branches, and shape the tree. Pruning is typically done during the dormant season.
Fertilization: Apply a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in late winter or early spring to promote healthy growth.
Watering: While Live Oaks are drought-tolerant once established, regular watering during dry periods, especially when young, promotes healthier growth and root development.


Select a planting site with ample space to accommodate its mature size. Dig a hole twice as wide and just as deep as the root ball. Place the tree in the hole, backfill with soil, and water thoroughly. Ensure there is enough space between trees and structures to allow for its wide canopy spread. Stake young trees if necessary to stabilize them until the root system is established.

Water newly planted trees regularly to establish a deep root system, then reduce frequency. Mature Live Oaks are drought-tolerant but benefit from occasional watering during prolonged dry spells. Prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade, thriving with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily for optimal growth and development.

We process and ship your order as quickly as possible, typically within 1-3 business days. You will receive a shipping confirmation with tracking information once your item(s) ship.

We have perfected packaging and shipping plants & trees! That is why we DO NOT use any third-party fulfillment like most other online retailers. Your trees go straight from our farm to your door, safely packaged by our team of seasoned professionals. Our process ensures your plants leave our facility and arrive to your door in the best condition possible!

In cases of extreme cold or hot weather, we may temporarily delay shipping to ensure the well-being of your plants. Our primary focus is on delivering healthy and thriving plants to you. Rest assured, we'll make every effort to notify you of any delays promptly.

Please allow additional ship times during inclement weather and sale periods. We do not process or ship orders on the weekend or U.S. Holidays. Simply Trees is not responsible for delays due to carriers, local disruptions, or weather.

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At Simply Trees, we're committed to your satisfaction. If your plants arrive considerably damaged or sustained damage beyond the point of recovery, please contact us within five days at sales@simplytrees.store with clear photos for assistance. Our 30-day guarantee covers issues after planting, subject to our terms and conditions. We can't cover plants in the wrong climate or with inadequate care, but we're here to help in other situations. For a detailed understanding of our 30-day guarantee and how we ensure a fair process, click here to learn more.

USDA GROW ZONE:

Zones 7-10

The Live Oak Tree thrives in the warm, humid climates of USDA Zones 7-10, preferring well-drained soil but adaptable to a variety of soil types, from sandy to clay. Its ability to endure coastal conditions, including salt spray and occasional flooding, alongside its resistance to pests and diseases, makes it a resilient and versatile choice for a wide range of southern landscapes.

Frequently Asked Questions

Live Oak trees are known for their impressive size and majestic appearance. These trees can grow to be quite large at maturity, with wide-spreading crowns and substantial trunk diameters. Here are some typical size characteristics of Live Oak trees:

Height: Live Oak trees can reach heights of 40 to 80 feet at maturity, although exceptional specimens may grow even taller under optimal growing conditions. The height of Live Oak trees can vary depending on factors such as environmental conditions, soil quality, and genetic factors.

Crown Spread: Live Oak trees have broad, spreading crowns that can extend to distances equal to or greater than the tree's height. The crown spread of Live Oak trees typically ranges from 60 to 100 feet or more, providing ample shade and creating a picturesque silhouette.

Trunk Diameter: The trunk of a mature Live Oak tree can have a diameter of 3 to 4 feet or more, with a massive, gnarled appearance. Live Oak trees often develop strong, sturdy trunks that provide structural support for the wide-spreading branches and dense canopy.

Root System: Live Oak trees have extensive root systems that spread wide and shallow, anchoring the tree firmly in the soil and providing stability. The roots of Live Oaks can extend far beyond the tree's canopy, often reaching distances equal to or greater than the crown spread.

Lifespan: Live Oak trees are long-lived, with some specimens living for several hundred years or more under favorable growing conditions. Their slow to moderate growth rate and resilience to environmental stressors contribute to their longevity.

Overall, Live Oak trees are renowned for their size, longevity, and iconic appearance in landscapes. These majestic trees add beauty, shade, and wildlife habitat to their surroundings and are valued for their cultural and ecological significance in many regions. When planting Live Oak trees, it's essential to consider their mature size and spacing requirements to ensure they have ample room to grow and thrive in your landscape.

Live Oak trees are known for their relatively slow to moderate growth rate compared to some other tree species. The growth rate of Live Oak trees can vary depending on factors such as environmental conditions, soil quality, and cultural practices. Here are some general considerations regarding the growth rate of Live Oak trees:

Initial Growth: When young, Live Oak trees typically exhibit a moderate growth rate, with an average annual growth of around 12 to 24 inches in height under optimal growing conditions. During the first few years of growth, Live Oaks may establish a strong root system and develop a more robust canopy.

Mature Growth: As Live Oak trees mature, their growth rate may slow down, with annual height increases averaging around 6 to 12 inches or less. However, Live Oak trees can continue to grow throughout their lifespan, albeit at a slower pace compared to their early years.

Environmental Factors: Environmental conditions play a significant role in determining the growth rate of Live Oak trees. Adequate sunlight, moisture, and nutrient availability can promote healthy growth and development. Conversely, factors such as drought, poor soil quality, or competition with other plants may inhibit growth.

Cultural Practices: Proper care and maintenance can influence the growth rate of Live Oak trees. Providing regular watering during periods of drought, fertilizing with a balanced fertilizer, and ensuring proper soil drainage can help support healthy growth. Avoiding stressors such as overpruning, root disturbance, or mechanical damage can also promote optimal growth.

Longevity: Live Oak trees are known for their longevity, with some specimens living for several hundred years or more. While their growth rate may slow with age, Live Oaks can continue to add new growth and maintain their structural integrity over time.

Overall, Live Oak trees exhibit a slow to moderate growth rate, with initial growth being more rapid in young trees and slowing down as they mature. By providing proper care and favorable growing conditions, you can help support the healthy growth and development of Live Oak trees in your landscape.

The best place to plant Live Oak trees depends on various factors such as soil conditions, sunlight exposure, space availability, and intended landscape use. Live Oak trees are well-suited to a variety of environments and can thrive in different locations, from residential yards to public parks. Here are some considerations for selecting the best planting location for Live Oak trees:

Sunlight: Live Oak trees prefer full sun to partial shade, meaning they thrive in locations that receive at least six hours of direct sunlight per day. When selecting a planting site, choose an area with ample sunlight exposure to promote healthy growth and development.

Soil Conditions: Live Oak trees are adaptable to a wide range of soil types, including sandy, loamy, or clay soils, as long as the soil is well-draining. Avoid planting in areas with poorly drained or waterlogged soil, as this can lead to root rot and other issues. Conduct a soil test to assess soil pH and fertility, and amend the soil as needed to improve drainage and nutrient levels.

Space Availability: Live Oak trees have a spreading growth habit and can reach impressive sizes at maturity. Ensure there is sufficient space for the tree to grow without overcrowding other plants, structures, or utilities. Consider the tree's mature height and crown spread when selecting a planting site, and allow ample room for the tree to expand over time.

Urban Environments: Live Oak trees are well-suited to urban environments and can thrive in residential yards, parks, streetscapes, and other urban settings. They provide valuable shade, habitat for wildlife, and aesthetic beauty in urban landscapes. When planting in urban areas, consider factors such as proximity to buildings, sidewalks, and utilities, and choose a location that minimizes potential conflicts with infrastructure.

Wind Exposure: Live Oak trees are relatively wind-resistant and can tolerate coastal conditions, making them suitable for planting in coastal areas or regions with high winds. However, provide protection from strong winds during the tree's establishment period to promote healthy root growth and reduce the risk of wind damage.

Aesthetic Considerations: Consider the role of Live Oak trees in your landscape design and choose planting locations that enhance the overall aesthetic appeal of your outdoor space. Live Oak trees make excellent focal points, shade trees, or specimens in garden beds, borders, or lawn areas.

Overall, the best place to plant Live Oak trees is in a location that provides adequate sunlight, well-draining soil, sufficient space for growth, and minimal conflicts with other plants or structures. By considering these factors and selecting a suitable planting site, you can ensure the long-term health and beauty of your Live Oak trees in your landscape.

When planting a Live Oak tree near your house, it's essential to consider the tree's mature size, root spread, and potential impacts on nearby structures. Live Oak trees are known for their expansive root systems and wide-spreading crowns, so proper spacing is crucial to avoid future conflicts. Here are some general guidelines for planting Live Oak trees relative to your house:

Mature Size: Live Oak trees can reach impressive sizes at maturity, with wide-spreading crowns that can extend beyond the tree's height. Consider the tree's mature height and crown spread when determining planting distance from your house.

Minimum Distance: As a general rule of thumb, plant Live Oak trees at least 20 to 30 feet away from your house to allow ample room for the tree to grow without interfering with structures or utilities. This distance helps prevent potential issues such as root intrusion, canopy overhang, or damage to foundations.

Consider Root Spread: Live Oak trees have extensive root systems that can spread far beyond the tree's canopy. Planting the tree too close to your house can lead to root intrusion into foundations, underground utilities, or septic systems over time. Maintain a safe distance to minimize the risk of root-related damage.

Utility Lines: Avoid planting Live Oak trees near underground or overhead utility lines to prevent future conflicts. Consider the location of utility lines when selecting a planting site and choose a location that allows adequate clearance from utilities.

Future Growth: Anticipate the tree's future growth and ensure sufficient space for the canopy to expand without crowding nearby structures or shading windows. Planting Live Oak trees too close to your house can result in overhanging branches, which may require pruning or cause debris accumulation on rooftops.

Local Regulations: Check local regulations, homeowner association guidelines, or municipal ordinances regarding tree planting distances and requirements. Some jurisdictions may have specific guidelines or setback requirements for planting trees near structures.

By following these guidelines and considering the tree's mature size, root spread, and potential impacts on nearby structures, you can plant Live Oak trees in a location that enhances your landscape while minimizing potential conflicts with your house and property. Consulting with a professional arborist or landscape designer can provide additional guidance tailored to your specific site and landscape needs.

The frequency of watering for Live Oak trees depends on various factors such as soil type, weather conditions, and the tree's age and stage of growth. Here are some general guidelines to help you determine how often to water your Live Oak:

Establishment Period: Newly planted Live Oak trees require regular watering to establish a healthy root system. Water deeply immediately after planting, and continue to water regularly for the first year or two until the tree becomes established. Watering frequency during the establishment period may vary depending on soil moisture levels and weather conditions, but aim to keep the soil consistently moist, not waterlogged.

Soil Type: Consider the soil type in which your Live Oak is planted. Well-draining soils may require more frequent watering, especially during hot, dry weather, as they tend to dry out faster. Heavy clay soils may retain moisture longer and require less frequent watering.

Weather Conditions: Monitor weather conditions in your area to adjust your watering schedule accordingly. During periods of hot, dry weather, Live Oak trees may require more frequent watering to compensate for increased evaporation and water loss. Conversely, reduce watering during periods of heavy rainfall or cooler temperatures.

Deep Watering: When watering your Live Oak, aim to water deeply to encourage deep root growth. Apply water slowly and evenly around the tree's drip line (the outer edge of the canopy) to ensure thorough saturation of the root zone. Avoid shallow watering, which can encourage shallow root growth and make the tree more susceptible to drought stress.

Mulching: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of your Live Oak tree to help conserve soil moisture, regulate soil temperature, and reduce water evaporation. Mulch also helps suppress weed growth and improve soil structure over time.

Observation: Monitor your Live Oak tree regularly for signs of drought stress, such as wilting leaves, leaf curling, or browning leaf edges. Adjust your watering frequency as needed based on the tree's response and soil moisture levels.

Overall, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to how often you should water your Live Oak tree. It's essential to consider factors such as soil type, weather conditions, and the tree's individual needs when determining the appropriate watering schedule. Aim to maintain consistent soil moisture levels, avoiding both waterlogged and overly dry conditions, to promote the health and vigor of your Live Oak tree.

The main difference between Live Oak and "regular" oak trees lies in their species and geographic distribution. Here's a comparison between Live Oak and typical oak trees:

Species:
Live Oak (Quercus virginiana): Live Oak is a species of oak tree native to the southeastern United States, particularly along the Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast regions. It is an evergreen tree with small, leathery leaves that remain green throughout the year.
"Regular" Oak Trees: The term "regular" oak trees is broad and may refer to various species within the Quercus genus, including deciduous oaks such as White Oak (Quercus alba), Red Oak (Quercus rubra), and many others. These oak species are typically deciduous, meaning they shed their leaves in the fall.

Leaf Characteristics:
Live Oak: Live Oak leaves are small, thick, and leathery, with an elliptical or oval shape. They are evergreen, meaning they remain on the tree year-round.
"Regular" Oak Trees: Leaves of deciduous oak trees vary in size, shape, and texture depending on the species. They are typically larger and thinner than Live Oak leaves and turn various shades of yellow, orange, or brown in the fall before dropping from the tree.

Geographic Distribution:
Live Oak: Live Oak is primarily found in the southeastern United States, including states such as Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, and South Carolina. It thrives in coastal regions and is often seen in landscapes, parks, and along roadsides.
"Regular" Oak Trees: Deciduous oak species have a broader geographic distribution and can be found in various habitats across North America, Europe, and Asia. They occur in diverse ecosystems, including forests, woodlands, and urban areas.

Growing Habit:
Live Oak: Live Oak trees have a spreading growth habit, with low, broad crowns and wide-spreading branches. They are often prized for their picturesque form and provide ample shade in landscapes.
"Regular" Oak Trees: Deciduous oak trees exhibit a wide range of growth habits, including upright, spreading, or pyramidal forms, depending on the species. Their crown shape and size can vary significantly.

While Live Oak and deciduous oak trees are both members of the Quercus genus and share some characteristics, their species, leaf habits, geographic distribution, and growing habits distinguish them from each other. Live Oak's evergreen foliage and coastal distribution are among the most notable features that set it apart from other oak species.

Live Oak trees are known for their extensive root systems, which can be both deep and wide-spreading. Here's an overview of Live Oak root characteristics:

Shallow and Wide-Spreading: Live Oak trees typically have shallow root systems that extend horizontally rather than deeply into the soil. These surface roots can spread out to distances equal to or greater than the width of the tree's canopy.

Adaptability: Live Oaks are well-adapted to their natural habitats, which often include sandy or loamy soils with limited water availability. Their shallow root systems help them efficiently capture water from rainfall and surface sources.

Structural Stability: Despite their shallow roots, Live Oaks are generally structurally stable trees. Their extensive root systems anchor them firmly in the ground and provide support against strong winds and storms.

Interconnected Network: Live Oak roots form an interconnected network close to the soil surface, allowing them to efficiently absorb water and nutrients. This network also facilitates communication and resource sharing among neighboring trees, contributing to the overall health of the forest ecosystem.

Surface Roots: Live Oak trees commonly produce surface roots that may become visible above the ground or cause bumps in lawns or landscapes. These surface roots are a natural part of the tree's growth habit and help stabilize the tree in the soil.

Potential Issues: While Live Oak roots are generally beneficial, they can sometimes pose challenges for homeowners or landscapers. Surface roots may interfere with lawn maintenance or landscaping activities, and care should be taken to avoid damaging them during construction or excavation projects.

Overall, Live Oak trees have a combination of deep and wide-spreading roots, with a significant portion of the root system located close to the soil surface. Understanding the characteristics of Live Oak roots can help homeowners and landscapers make informed decisions about tree care, landscaping, and property maintenance.

Yes, mulching around Live Oak trees can be beneficial for the health and vigor of the tree, as well as for the overall landscape. Here are some reasons why mulching around Live Oak trees is recommended:

Moisture Retention: Mulch helps retain soil moisture by reducing evaporation and minimizing water runoff. This is particularly important for Live Oaks, which prefer moist soil conditions. Adequate soil moisture promotes healthy root growth and reduces the risk of drought stress.

Weed Suppression: Mulch acts as a natural weed barrier, suppressing weed growth around the base of the tree. Weeds compete with Live Oaks for water, nutrients, and sunlight, so reducing weed competition can benefit the tree's health.

Temperature Regulation: Mulch insulates the soil, helping to regulate soil temperature fluctuations. This is especially beneficial in regions with hot summers and cold winters, where mulch can help protect the tree's roots from extreme temperatures.

Soil Improvement: As organic mulch breaks down over time, it enriches the soil with organic matter, nutrients, and beneficial microorganisms. This improves soil structure, fertility, and drainage, creating a healthier growing environment for Live Oaks.

Erosion Control: Mulch helps prevent soil erosion by reducing the impact of raindrops and minimizing soil compaction. This is important for Live Oaks, which have shallow root systems that can be susceptible to erosion.

When mulching around Live Oak trees, follow these guidelines for best results:

- Apply a layer of mulch 2 to 4 inches thick around the base of the tree, extending out to the drip line if possible.
- Leave a gap between the mulch and the trunk of the tree to prevent moisture buildup and reduce the risk of trunk rot.
- Use organic mulch materials such as shredded bark, wood chips, or compost. Avoid using rubber mulch or inorganic materials that do not break down and may harm the tree.
- Refresh the mulch layer periodically to maintain its effectiveness and appearance.

Overall, mulching around Live Oak trees can help conserve moisture, suppress weeds, improve soil quality, and protect the tree's roots, contributing to the overall health and beauty of the landscape.

Live Oaks are generally evergreen trees, meaning they retain their leaves throughout the year. However, there are several reasons why a Live Oak may be losing its leaves prematurely:

Environmental Stress: Live Oaks may lose their leaves due to environmental stressors such as drought, extreme temperatures, or strong winds. Insufficient water or excessive heat can cause the tree to shed leaves as a survival mechanism to reduce water loss through transpiration.

Water Stress: Prolonged periods of drought or inadequate irrigation can stress Live Oaks and lead to leaf drop. Ensure your Live Oak receives sufficient water, especially during dry spells, to maintain soil moisture and prevent dehydration.

Transplant Shock: Newly planted Live Oaks may experience transplant shock, resulting in leaf drop as the tree adjusts to its new environment. Proper watering, mulching, and care during the establishment period can help minimize transplant stress and encourage root growth.

Pest Infestation: Infestations of pests such as oak leafrollers, oak leafminers, or spider mites can damage Live Oak leaves and cause premature leaf drop. Monitor your tree for signs of pest activity and treat as needed with appropriate insecticides or insecticidal soaps.

Disease: Fungal diseases such as oak wilt, anthracnose, or powdery mildew can affect Live Oaks and lead to leaf drop. Proper cultural practices, including pruning to improve air circulation and promoting overall tree health, can help prevent disease outbreaks.

Nutrient Deficiency: Nutrient deficiencies, particularly in essential nutrients such as nitrogen, can weaken Live Oaks and contribute to leaf drop. Conduct a soil test to assess nutrient levels and amend the soil as needed to improve fertility.

Physical Damage: Physical damage to the roots, trunk, or branches of Live Oaks can stress the tree and result in leaf drop. Avoid mechanical damage from lawn equipment or construction activities, and protect the tree from injury.

If your Live Oak is losing its leaves, carefully inspect the tree for signs of stress, pests, diseases, or other issues. Address any underlying problems promptly to promote tree health and minimize leaf drop. If necessary, consult with a certified arborist or horticulturalist for professional diagnosis and treatment recommendations.

Brown leaves on a Live Oak can indicate several potential issues, including environmental stress, pests, diseases, or cultural factors. Here are some common reasons why the leaves on your Live Oak may be turning brown:

Water Stress: Live Oaks are relatively drought-tolerant once established, but prolonged periods of drought or inconsistent watering can cause leaves to turn brown and dry out. Ensure your Live Oak is receiving adequate water, especially during dry spells, and mulch around the base to retain soil moisture.

Overwatering: Conversely, overwatering can lead to root rot, which affects the tree's ability to absorb water and nutrients, resulting in browning of the leaves. Avoid excessive watering and ensure proper drainage to prevent waterlogged soil.

Soil Issues: Poor soil quality, compaction, or nutrient deficiencies can stress Live Oaks and lead to browning of the leaves. Conduct a soil test to assess soil pH and nutrient levels, and amend the soil as needed to improve fertility and drainage.

Environmental Factors: Environmental stressors such as extreme temperatures, strong winds, or air pollution can damage Live Oak leaves, causing them to turn brown. Provide protection from harsh environmental conditions, such as planting windbreaks or providing supplemental irrigation during hot, dry weather.

Pests: Pests such as oak leafrollers, oak leafminers, or spider mites can infest Live Oaks, causing damage to the leaves and leading to browning. Monitor your tree for signs of pest infestation and treat as necessary using appropriate insecticides or insecticidal soaps.

Diseases: Fungal diseases such as oak wilt, anthracnose, or powdery mildew can affect Live Oaks, causing leaf browning, spotting, or defoliation. Proper cultural practices, such as pruning to improve air circulation and promoting overall tree health, can help prevent disease outbreaks.

Cultural Issues: Improper planting, excessive pruning, or physical damage to the roots or trunk can stress Live Oaks and result in leaf browning. Ensure proper planting depth, avoid excessive pruning, and protect the tree from mechanical damage.

Inspect your Live Oak carefully to determine the underlying cause of the leaf browning, and take appropriate action to address the issue. If the problem persists or worsens, consider consulting with a certified arborist or horticulturalist for professional diagnosis and treatment recommendations.

Our Process

We have perfected packaging and shipping plants & trees! That is why we DO NOT use any third-party fulfillment like most other online retailers. Your trees go straight from our farm to your door, safely packaged by our team of seasoned professionals. Our process ensures your plants leave our facility and arrive to your door in the best condition possible!